.

interactions

creative strategies for business

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)

Newsnight editor Ian Katz outlines what he believes is wrong about the TV political interview in this Financial Times article.  In summary what's wrong is that the interview has become a dance between defensive politicians and aggressive interviewers - each frustrated by the others' attempts to prevent a discussion about what is really going on.  But Katz outlines a new manifesto for how this relationship could move forward and his four points could be easily transported into any environment in ... [read more]

Crafting questions that matter

Financial Times journalist Jo Ellison in an article entitled Fear and Clothing reviews two books which argue the case for why clothes and fashion matter.  Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton began with a survey of over 600 people about their relationship with clothes.  Worn Stories by Emily Spivack describes the emotional connections we have with various pieces of clothing (such as Marina Abramovic's relationship with the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China).  What struck me about the ... [read more]

Entitlement

The Internet is what you make of it, obviously. And there are aspiring writers who use digital technology to read and research and seek the counsel of their peers. But the Internet has also been a great aggregator of anxiety and an enabler of our worst tendencies. It has allowed us to trumpet our own opinions, to win attention by broadcasting our laziest and cruelest judgments, to grind axes in public. It has made us feel, in some perverse sense, ... [read more]

The secret (emotional) language of food

This article from Dan Jurafsky (based on his book The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu) is fascinating.  He researched restaurant reviews...that's right...over 900,000 of them relating to 6.500 individual restaurants; he also reviewed the language on the back of food packets plus restaurant menus, and the results were fascinating.  But food writing, to a linguist like me, isn’t just about food. The words you use when you write a restaurant review say as much about your own psychology as they ... [read more]

The value of conflict in organisations

I've been re-watching Margaret Heffernan's TED talk on the value of conflict in organisations.  I particularly like this quote So how do organizations think? Well, for the most part, they don't. And that isn't because they don't want to, it's really because they can't. And they can't because the people inside of them are too afraid of conflict. The organisation as rational, cognitive, thinking model is really debunked by Heffernan in an eloquent and convincing argument.  How many organisations do you know (or work in or with) that ... [read more]

Silicon Valley’s culture of failure

Most startups fail. However many entrepreneurs still overestimate the chances of success – and the cost of failure. This interesting piece front the Guardian focusses on the current reification of 'failure' (as it relates to start-ups).  The myth of 'failure' remains alluring in certain circles, as though you have earned the right to succeed only if you've amounted a number of failed enterprises in your past.  The problem with the 'failure' myth is that it doesn't account for the emotional fall out ... [read more]

Feedback

It's always nice to get positive feedback.  A bottle of champagne is terrific...perhaps a card or two? But what about when a student tells you that you have successfully dismantled his entire understanding of people management in a two hour class on Managing Change  Well that's delicious feedback.  Why? Because the class in question was about resistance and the role resistance plays in managing change (or, not managing change as the case may be).  My position on resistance has always ... [read more]

Tweet your thesis

Could you distill your research into 140 characters? https://storify.com/annetteclancy/tweet-your-thesis-3

work/life balance vs work/life integration

This  New York Times article from 2012 highlights the way work/life balance has been organised and, how that dividing line is shifting.  It used to be 'work/life balance' and now, it's 'work/life integration'.  More and more companies it seems are offering perks to help workers manage home life from the perspective that a happier home and personal life makes for a happier and productive work environment. 'They’re trying to get at people’s larger lives and sanity,” Mr. Lewin said. “You might call ... [read more]

What’s wrong with the political interview (and how to fix it)